“Fright Night” doesn’t disappoint and brings the fear

Fright+Night+is+no+Twilight%2C+and+this+movie+will+keep+you+on+the+edge+of+your+seat.+%28Dreamworks+II+Distribution%29
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“Fright Night” doesn’t disappoint and brings the fear

Fright Night is no Twilight, and this movie will keep you on the edge of your seat. (Dreamworks II Distribution)

Fright Night is no Twilight, and this movie will keep you on the edge of your seat. (Dreamworks II Distribution)

Fright Night is no Twilight, and this movie will keep you on the edge of your seat. (Dreamworks II Distribution)

Fright Night is no Twilight, and this movie will keep you on the edge of your seat. (Dreamworks II Distribution)

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Although this is a remake of the 1985 original, these are different times which allow for a contemporary adaptation and new perspective, so leave all preconceptions at the door. What was then was, what is now is. However, this is one of the few movies of its genre in years that satiates that thirst for a fulfilling experience of thrill, exploits your sense of revulsion, and plays on your fear all at the same time.

The vampire has redeemed itself! So if you’re looking for a sparkly, undernourished hunky bloodsucker (which is a walking contradiction to the vampire’s nature), you are in the wrong place. Colin Farrell plays the lead, delivering an admirable performance, sneering when inhaling, twitching in impatience and crouching in expectancy; every mannerism a tendency of his merciless character.

Also starring Toni Collette and Imogen Poots, this movie is everything but honey coated. Starting off with old-school horror music gives it a sense of haunting–a device that sets you up in anticipation. The film revolves around the fanged threat who moves in next door to Charlie Brewer, (Anton Yelchin, Terminator: Salvation) who has moved on from his “dweeb” days and lives a pretty uneventful life until he must prevent those who matter to him from facing vampire Jerry’s wrath.

Clearly not an option for the faint-hearted, this film is very graphic. Every detail is depicted vividly. Consequently our toothy friend has you digging deeper into your seat. Any trace of will you had to unglue your eyes from Farrell’s portrayal of satanic Jerry (a vampire who has an uncanny talent of being equally malignant and appealing in a macabre fashion) is erased.

Quite quickly (thirty minutes into the movie) the true intentions of this blood thirsty monster are disclosed. It becomes a race for survival as Jerry betrays nothing of what he stands for. The way in which he consumes his victims with greed and voraciousness define him as an insatiable gourmand.

With a ha-ha now and then, the bloodshed laden scenes make it the perfect blend of comedy overflowing with startling scares and resulting in many hold-your-breath moments. Keeping its fast-paced thread all throughout, director Craig Gillespie does a great job setting the film in a secluded cul-de-sac of a town in Las Vegas, creating an intimate feel, making the events seem all the more plausible.

As soon as the vampire comes on scene he is commander of your emotions and you know that he’s going to wreak havoc like a tornado, sweeping through this mundane neighborhood, filling the theater with a sense of dread.

The impacting cinematography and impressive method acting backed up by in-your-face gore give this movie an edge, so it’s time for all you horror devotees to enliven!

Targeted for an audience who enjoy gruesome, over the top Rh factor spillage who want to revel under the twisted killer charm (literally) of Farrell’s intimidating gaze that penetrates your being.