The title explains it all

 (Courtesy of New Line Cinema)

(Courtesy of New Line Cinema)

The hype began last year when Samuel L. Jackson signed on to do a little film based on its title alone without even having read the script. It would snowball from there into an underground juggernaut without anyone having even seen a frame of the film.Prior to its release, people spoke about this film with a passion usually reserved for pretentious self-important art films. The film in question is “Snakes on a Plane”; which I will refer to as “SoaP” for the rest of the review.SoaP is about a flight featuring various stereotypes and one-dimensional characters. Also on this flight of doom are F.B.I. agents, including a deliciously scene chewing Sam Jackson.They are protecting a witness who must fly to testify. This is what sets up the crux for the film, as the mob boss who would be arrested for the murder gets 450 snakes snuck on the plane full of pheromones that make them hostile. To say anymore about the plot would spoil it.Originally intended to be a PG-13 affair, it was given the blessing by the studio to be rated R and have an extra five days of shooting to inject the film with more R content.The decision helped the film greatly as it allowed for more of the charm and wit of the picture to come through. It allowed nudity, cursing, and all the other horror clichés the film “Scream” parodied to be included.In addition, it made it possible for the now infamous line; which is too “R” to mention in this review; from the fake internet trailer to be included in the final cut of the film.Another terribly clever point worth mentioning is that, even though this is obviously a big joke that everyone is in on, the film is played completely straight. They never “wink” at the audience but instead make a film that can cause an honest moment of fright and a pervasive sense of discomfort all while making you laugh and applaud.SoaP was directed by David R. Ellis, who is probably best known for having co-written and directed “Final Destination 2.” His previous credit mentioned because much of what worked so well in that film is offered here.As in “Final Destination 2,” SoaP is a tongue-in-cheek horror film shot like an action-adventure.It features characters whose names you never need to know and probably will not remember if you ever learn. In addition, anyone can die at any moment and the way you will react to the death is completely in the control of the director.Be it humor or pathos, Ellis knows how to be the puppet master of this vaudevillian revue of a film. You just have to go along for the ride.What a wonderful ride it is. This is escapist popcorn fluff, but it is such a joy to behold what will happen next. All the deaths, reactions, quotable lines and “snake-vision” combine to create something that is not “so-bad-it’s-good” but “so-inspired-it’s-bloody-brilliant”!