“Mr. Peabody & Sherman” review: about as cool as lemonade on an Ancient Egyptian day

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“Mr. Peabody & Sherman” review: about as cool as lemonade on an Ancient Egyptian day

Mr. Peabody & Sherman are remade into the 21st century after starring in animated shorts in the 60's (Creative Commons)

Mr. Peabody & Sherman are remade into the 21st century after starring in animated shorts in the 60's (Creative Commons)

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Mr. Peabody & Sherman are remade into the 21st century after starring in animated shorts in the 60's (Creative Commons)

Creative Comments

Creative Comments

Mr. Peabody & Sherman are remade into the 21st century after starring in animated shorts in the 60's (Creative Commons)

Reynaldo Garcia, TSV Entertainment Editor

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“Mr. Peabody & Sherman” might be a little too clever for its own good.

The film is obviously aimed at kids, but it seems like it was also trying to appeal to older audiences. In the process, “Peabody & Sherman” is too convulated for kids, but smart enough for older folks to enjoy. Visually, it’s immaculate.

“Mr. Peabody & Sherman” revolve around its namesake: The decorated dog with an enormously high IQ Mr. Peabody and, get this, his adopted human son, Sherman. (Hey, I’ve never seen the original short, so it surprised me!) The dynamic duo constantly travel back and forth in time through the WABAC, which looks like the Apple logo in red. And that’s where the fun ensues.

They travel back to the beginning of the French Revolution, visit Leonardo DaVinci in the midst of painting the Mona Lisa and drop in during the Greek’s assault on Troy, inside the Trojan Horse. At first, it was for educational purposes, (Mr. Peabody teaching Sherman history through first hand experience). But when mean girl Penny gets lost back in Egypt during King Tut’s time, P&S; must go back and rescue her.

The movie explores the themes of the relationship between father and son, loyalty and also the complicated multiverse/timetravel concept. The latter is sure to confuse the kiddos. As most people can attest, there is a period where you and your parents always fought. Well, for Sherman, it’s a little early. But in this case, where he’s adopted, Mr. Peabody didn’t tell him of potentially being taken away by Child Services.

Sherman then sets out to prove what most boys want to prove: that they’re brave and can take on anything. But in the end, him and Mr. Peabody show their love and loyalty towards each other.

When it comes to the time travel and multiverse theory, I got a little lost myself, especially towards the end, the resolution. When a black hole threatens the fabric of time, P&S; must go into the future to stop it. Again, it’s confusing. (The whole time, I couldn’t stop thinking “Stewie and Brian”).

Ty Burrell voices Mr. Peabody to a T. He gives Peabody the brainy, almost teflon-like aura through his voice: a monotonous, almost emotionless tone. Max Charles voices much energy and enough dopiness for Sherman. Another standout is Patrick Warburton. He gives his signature energetic delivery, almost yelling, to King Agamemnon, also known as the guy who’s wife started the Trojan War. Visually, it’s a pretty movie to look at. The 3D gives it a nice bounce, but it’s nothing special.

“Mr. Peabody & Sherman” is a smart, tender sweet ride, albeit excessively smart for its intended audience. The film starts slow, but the second half is a thrill, even with the confusing storyline. Kids will get mesmerized and enjoy it, and adults might have a high regard for it as well.

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Update: this article has been updated and changed to better reflect the article. 1:08 .p.m. 3/17/2014.